These original paintings are for sale.

Shipping costs or delivery will depend on location and weight.

Unfinished Business


From left to right: Faith walks confidently over the water towards Flora and Fauna. Behind her Renewal throws a bucket of red paint over the black-and-white floor (red on black and white symbolises renewal). Children are happily making hand and footprints with the red paint. A clown is putting on a brave face before moving into the crowd. Another clown is moving carefully, closely followed by a puffin. Prudence on a pogo-stick finds she can be just as fast as the rat race behind her, but in a much more fun way. A little boy has found a (calming) chamomile flower among the chaos. Love has come to help Flora and Fauna. Her white dress has all the colours of the rainbow in it and the red thread coming from Patience’s cloth weaves in and out of her. Near Flora’s head grow poppies in disturbed earth. Already there is a hole in Fauna’s endangered species dress and she fears that others may follow. Behind her Fortitude is carrying all sorts of things that, though perhaps small or seemingly insignificant, can make a world of difference when they fall into place: a smile, an ear, a love that has survived many years, time to read, green transport, finding your own golden egg or just a silver lining to a cloud. The fish is back in the river of hope, which runs through the world. Self-righteousness in his own bubble won’t get his feet wet and crosses the river on his own bridge, made out of trampled culture. A little girl has found a calendula to help with the healing of wounds, while in the background the rat race runs out of time and fights for a place on the ladders. Hope waters the olive tree of peace, sitting on a wall of blocks of crushed metal. Drops of water refresh the burning skies and fill the river. A well-meaning woman with a chip on her shoulder wades knee deep through it. Patience knits her metal threads into a vast cloth and her friend Humility is waiting with a knitting needle to pop Self-righteousness’s bubble. Time is sitting on the hands of a clock, stopping it in order to smell a sprig of thyme. Taking his last bow a clown spreads his arms and links this world to the next. Expectation knocks on the door. Below in the metal waste lies Laziness watching soaps on a broken television. The composition through all three panels is a smile in spite of it all.


Painting size – width mm x height mm: 2960 x 1500                                 £3,000,000 (90% of which will be given to my favourite charities)
Giclée prints available.

Commedia dell'Arte (and The Ivory Tower, see below)

 

The commedia dell’arte was the name of a street theatre found in Naples. In Venice, Goldoni added a script to improvised acting and soon the commedia spread all over Europe. Shakespeare used it in Much Ado About Nothing and so do the Punch and Judy puppet shows on the seafront. Recently it has made a come-back in theatre acting, in order to keep long running plays fresh. The Italian words are best translated into English as “the art of life”. 

The archetypal figures in the commedia dell’arte – Harlequin, Columbine, Pantalone, the Captain, the Doctor and the Lovers -  are presented here as Everyman in the arts. 

In every group of people you will find a clown, a helper, an authority figure, a gossip, a boaster and more often combinations of several of these figures. We all produce art in whatever we do, when it is done skilfully and from our heart.

 

Here are a few notes about the painting, starting with the acrobats who illustrate the Dutch saying: “let’s put all the madness on a little stick”, which means “let’s be serious for a moment”. From the stick we move to the balcony and find fashion design, theatre and dance. The sculpture at the top of the stairs represents a Harlequin knitting her clothes while wearing them. Black and white morality has “come out of the cobwebs” (another Dutch expression meaning to dust something off after a long time not being used) to join the party. Spring, winter, summer, autumn and the west wind follow each other down the stairs. Day and night are passing each other on the stairs. 

 A Harlequin finds a still moment to read. The Queen of Hearts is behind the Captain (who plays the first fiddle and blows his own trumpet) and the boy with the violin, who is introduced to the music scene and love. The Doctor, wheelbarrowed in on peppers and cabbages, plays the triangle (intrigue). The art of friendship is presented by the two young women sharing a cup of coffee. One of the Columbines plays a double bass(supportive tune) and has a dove (colomba) landing on it. Behind the girls Pantalone is keeping a watchful eye on the lovers. The Irish saying: “don’t give cherries to pigs, nor advice to fools” is being ignored by a Harlequin feeding cherries to a pig. Harlequins often solve problem situations with uncalculated humour.The art of storytelling goes on at a table, and Time, in the white suit, “stands still” to enjoy all the arts having a party together.

While in the Ivory Tower Time is running out for Nothing being made into Something, here all the arts and crafts enjoy the party together. 


This is a high quality full sized Giclée print, of an original oil on panel of 'The com media dell’arte' which was the name of a street theatre found in Naples. In every group of people you will find a clown, a helper, an authority figure, a gossip, a boaster and more often combinations of several of these figures. We all produce art in whatever we do, when it is done skilfully and from our heart.

Egg Tempera and oil on panel, width mm x height mm: 1500 x 1200  -  
£3,000,000 (90% of which will be given to my favourite charities)

Framed 1610 x 1320
Giclée prints available.
 

The Ivory Tower

 

An imaginary place high above the ordinary world. The picture is very literal. The tower is ivory coloured. The writing is on the wall. Dark clouds and storm birds are gathering. Time, a man in a white suit holding an egg-timer, is running out. There is an exhibition of peas being held in the ivory tower. The single peas are displayed on pedestals, repeating the beauty and isolation of a small vegetable. A child has picked up one of the peas and fires it into the public with a pea-shooter. Behind him on the wall is a painting of the emperor’s new clothes. An artist, who doesn’t have a leg to stand on, is being wheeled into the centre of the bull’s eye floor by critics and media. The man in the dark suit is using the language which can make almost nothing into something.

Egg Tempera and oil on panel, width mm x height mm: 1500 x 1200                                                   £10,000 or free with Commedia dell' Arte 

Framed 1610 x 1320
Giclée prints available.

Pebbles

 

oil on canvas 900mm x900mm

framed 980mm x980mm 

£900 (Please contact me to discuss shipping cost)

Marriage

 

Watercolour 750mm x 560mm

framed 970mm x 795mm 

£900 (Please contact me to discuss shipping cost)